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A mission to Nepal

FRIENDS: Charisse (third from right) with some Nepalese women she befriended

CHARISEE BEAUMONT, formerly a mover and shaker in the UK gospel music scene, gave up her role running the gospel music label Preacher Boy Entertainment to go on missions to Nepal – one of the world’s most unreached countries.

She spent eight months there, and has come back to the UK a changed woman. She’s learnt to trust God more, became a vegetarian, is passionate about encouraging others to do missions, and is planning to go back there to do another two years of missionary work.

PASSION

Beaumont has had a passion for missions since becoming a Christian 16 years ago after reading Chasing The Dragon, a book about legendary missionary Jackie Pullinger, a British woman led by God to do missionary work with drug addicts in Hong Kong.

She said: “I’ve always been interested in missions. I had the same interest in missions as I had with music. Missions fuelled my desire to get as far as I could with music. However, in doing music, I didn’t get to engage with people the way I would have really liked to.”

Beaumont felt God gave her opportunities to engage more with people by nudging her to become a missionary. It was her original intention to go to India or China, but she ended up in Nepal, after being advised that’s where she should be. And she enjoyed being there.

“The people are lovely. They’re really great. They’re welcoming. I initially had reservations being a black woman so I just thought I’m really going to be persecuted, but that was not the case. I was welcomed as one of their own.”


ON A MISSION: Charisse Beaumont

She dressed in Nepalese clothing as she lived and ministered among the people, learnt the language and even worked with communities living in the Himalyas. She was, in many instances, the first black person many Nepalese people had ever met.

TRAVELLED

She recalls: “I was based in Kathmandu. Only 20 per cent of the population live in the city so everyone, 80 per cent live in villages. So I travelled from village to village to village, sharing the gospel, sometimes doing classic evangelism giving out tracts and books.

“Every day, we had nowhere to stay, so we would have to trust God for Him to provide somewhere for us to lay our heads and have a meal. Every night He did, and every day it was an opportunity to share the gospel with the people that hosted us, as well as the people who we saw on the way.”

She added: “Nepal has 341 [tribal] groups and 331 are amongst the most unreached people in the world. Nobody had shared the gospel in some of the regions that I went to.

“It was a privilege to be able to do that and the Lord was gracious enough for us to communicate it that they understood and some people got saved and we left the Bible with people and pray that people would read it.”

Beaumont has returned to the UK fired up and full of faith, and using her experiences to inspire a new generation of people to consider going on missions by giving talks in churches.

She says: “I believe as Christians we should be more missional – the harvest is ripe but the labourers are few.”

You can befriend Charisse Beaumont on Facebook or follow her on Twitter @preachergirl

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