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Film calls for an end to the ‘young, gifted and dead’

A TRAGIC DEATH: Mother-of-one Sabrina Moss, 24, was gunned down accidentally

AN AWARD-WINNING young director is seeking crowdfunding to create a film on the murder of Sabrina Moss, who was gunned down after getting caught in the crossfire of a north London gang feud.

Samuell Benta, the creator of the popular web series All About the McKenzies, was moved to bring the tragic tale, entitled Young, Gifted and Dead, to the big screen after being personally impacted by the death of the young mother. He is seeking to raise £150,000 by Spring 2015 to cover the costs of producing a high-quality feature-length film.

The 23-year-old was a personal friend of the writer/actor whom he got to know through volunteer work at his daughter’s nursery in north London. Sabrina was also her nursery teacher.

MISLED

Benta said: “Many young people have been misled into joining [gangs] which has cost them their lives, whether they get locked up or killed in the process. As a father of a five-year-old daughter this is not the kind of world I want her to grow up in.

“Although it takes a lot for change to happen, I do know that media is powerful and know that a film can help to make some sort of change in society. I’m very passionate about youth in the community and can't bare to see any more of these ‘young, gifted and dead’ stories in the paper and on the news.”

On the night she died, Sabrina had been out celebrating her birthday at Love&Liquor nightclub, in Kilburn, north London.

After leaving the venue on August 24, 2013, she and her friends went to the nearby Woody’s Grill, a popular after-hours eatery. Having ordered her food, Sabrina was standing outside when a gunman began firing shots, killing her and injuring her friend, Sabrina Gachette.


VISION: Samuell Benta

Benta added: “Knowing that Sabrina was caught in the crossfire sickens me as she was an innocent girl who got killed on her 24th birthday, which is enough to scare anybody. I used to play with her four-year-old son, giving him piggybacks and racing him on scooters in the playground and now this little boy has no mum.

“I knew that something had to be done not just to celebrate her memory but to get a message to gangs and let Sabrina's son have some sort of public closure when he gets older. The three murderers were all sentenced to 37 years each and I attended the final court hearing and witnessed that these boys had no remorse whatsoever.

Neither did they look bothered that they were getting such a sentence.”  

The 28-year-old, who works with the Wembley Crime Prevention initiative, said he hoped the film would not only preserve Sabrina’s legacy but also that of the “countless young, gifted youths who are now dead due to gun culture”.

Benta said he feared that communities were becoming desensitized by “horror stories on TV about the consistent repetitive gang crime and the loss of lives of young people”.

He was previously commissioned by Brent Council to make a film called Perceptions, which was entered into the British Urban Film Festival (BUFF).

In a plea to potential donors, Benta added: “Your contributions will help make this project a reality. You will be helping Sabrina's parents, her son and friends hold the torch for a subject matter such as this. This isn't just a film, its a movement for change…The quality of the film can vary for many reasons, but a simple rule of life applies to a movie: ‘You get what you pay for’. It has come down to me asking the public to help us out.”

Benta said he also wanted to keep the project independent to ensure the story would remain authentic.

To find out more about the film or to donate, visit www.sabrinamossfilm.com

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